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September 16 2010

08:02
08:02

HxD - Freeware Hex Editor and Disk Editor | mh-nexus

HxD is a carefully designed and fast hex editor which, additionally to raw disk editing and modifying of main memory (RAM), handles files of any size. The easy to use interface offers features such as searching and replacing, exporting, checksums/digests, insertion of byte patterns, a file shredder, concatenation or splitting of files, statistics and much more.
08:02

HxD - Freeware Hex Editor and Disk Editor | mh-nexus

HxD is a carefully designed and fast hex editor which, additionally to raw disk editing and modifying of main memory (RAM), handles files of any size.

The easy to use interface offers features such as searching and replacing, exporting, checksums/digests, insertion of byte patterns, a file shredder, concatenation or splitting of files, statistics and much more.

September 15 2010

11:11

Making Windows ready for the Desktop: A follow-up

It's been quite some time now since my post on how to make Windows usable for coding1). I thought it might be time for a follow-up, especially since I have since redefined some of my workflow, discovered new tools, etc.

For my Linux-mouse-behaviour I now incorporate Taekwindow instead of KatMouse, which started to freak out in my browser after a recent Firefox update. On top of the “scroll the window beneath the cursor and not the one with the focus” functionality, Taekwindow also adds Alt-dragging and -resizing to Windows.

For a simple and functional screenshot tool I have fallen in love with Greenshot. It is highly configurable (hotkeys for taking a screenshot of a definable section, the current window or the whole screen, the naming scheme to use for new screenies) and also comes with a simple image editor. All in all, I wouldn't want to miss it anymore when testing and creating bugs ;-) An interesting Linux equivalent would btw be Shutter.

Also a regular in my toolbox is now Notepad++ as my text editor of choice – I'd actually kill for a Linux port of this one ;-)

And last but not least, I have also installed ManicTime as my automatic time tracker, since my company really loves itself some timesheets. ManicTime automatically logs all focused windows (as in, application, window title, usage time), and these logs have really helped in the past to refresh my memory when I had to fill out my timesheet after a very busy day. I'm probably going to buy the pro version once my timesheet becomes more complex again2).

I also got rid of some applications though. I don't use Console2 or PuttyCyg anymore, and I also dumped the Samurize Clock Client with my custom clock/load monitor widget after Samurize started to crash or throwing weird error messages at me.

What I sadly also had to dump is VirtuaWin (and its “let's check this out” temporary replacement Dexpot. While I really love virtual desktops, and really really missed them when stating to use Windows again, I soon had to discover that Windows itself simply isn't ready for them yet. A couple of applications don't play well with being moved around from desktop to desktop3), and without some equivalent of DevilsPie4) virtual desktops are only half the fun anway.

1) at least for someone like me used to coding in a Linux environment, YMMV
2) damn you, consulting assignment *shakes her fist angrily*
3) I'm looking at you, Outlook! And at you too, Microsoft Communicator!
4) Dexpot has a window matching utility built in, but that didn't seem to be totally bugfree yet
Read or add comments to this article
11:11

Making Windows ready for the Desktop: A follow-up

It's been quite some time now since my post on how to make Windows usable for coding1). I thought it might be time for a follow-up, especially since I have since redefined some of my workflow, discovered new tools, etc.

For my Linux-mouse-behaviour I now incorporate Taekwindow instead of KatMouse, which started to freak out in my browser after a recent Firefox update. On top of the “scroll the window beneath the cursor and not the one with the focus” functionality, Taekwindow also adds Alt-dragging and -resizing to Windows.

For a simple and functional screenshot tool I have fallen in love with Greenshot. It is highly configurable (hotkeys for taking a screenshot of a definable section, the current window or the whole screen, the naming scheme to use for new screenies) and also comes with a simple image editor. All in all, I wouldn't want to miss it anymore when testing and creating bugs ;-) An interesting Linux equivalent would btw be Shutter.

Also a regular in my toolbox is now Notepad++ as my text editor of choice – I'd actually kill for a Linux port of this one ;-)

And last but not least, I have also installed ManicTime as my automatic time tracker, since my company really loves itself some timesheets. ManicTime automatically logs all focused windows (as in, application, window title, usage time), and these logs have really helped in the past to refresh my memory when I had to fill out my timesheet after a very busy day. I'm probably going to buy the pro version once my timesheet becomes more complex again2).

I also got rid of some applications though. I don't use Console2 or PuttyCyg anymore, and I also dumped the Samurize Clock Client with my custom clock/load monitor widget after Samurize started to crash or throwing weird error messages at me.

What I sadly also had to dump is VirtuaWin (and its “let's check this out” temporary replacement Dexpot. While I really love virtual desktops, and really really missed them when stating to use Windows again, I soon had to discover that Windows itself simply isn't ready for them yet. A couple of applications don't play well with being moved around from desktop to desktop3), and without some equivalent of DevilsPie4) virtual desktops are only half the fun anway.

1) at least for someone like me used to coding in a Linux environment, YMMV
2) damn you, consulting assignment *shakes her fist angrily*
3) I'm looking at you, Outlook! And at you too, Microsoft Communicator!
4) Dexpot has a window matching utility built in, but that didn't seem to be totally bugfree yet
Read or add comments to this article

April 08 2010

21:19

Taekwindow

Taekwindow is a simple, lightweight and free Windows program that allows you to move and resize windows by dragging them with the Alt key, similar to many X11 window managers. Also makes scrolling focus automatically follow mousecursor (also similar to X11).
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